A Thai Folk Tale: Seven-Coloured Emerald

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I’ve read the Thai folk tale ‘Seven-Coloured Emerald’ in ‘Folk Tales of Thailand’ (1976) by P.C. Roy Chaudhury. Thus, today I’d like to retell this story with a moral for you.

Thai Folk Tale: Seven-Coloured Emerald

Once there was a King called Hongse Thong who was married to two Queens. He had two children with the elder Queen, Prince Hongse Yout the Crown Prince and Princess Sroi Pradub. With the younger Queen, the King had only one son called Prince Hongse Noi.

Gachala Emerald, precious like the seven-coloured emerald in this Thai folk tale (photo credit: thisisbossi, wikimedia.org)

Gachala Emerald, precious like the seven-coloured emerald in this Thai folk tale (photo credit: thisisbossi, wikimedia.org)

The King had become very old and thus he thought about how to distribute his royal treasure. Of course only a male could become King and hence he left nothing to his daughter. The King cherished most his beautiful great seven-coloured emerald and wanted to give it to his oldest son, the Crown Prince. For this reason, the younger son complained to his father that he did not get anything in place of the emerald.

The court was split by the disagreement between the younger son and the decision of his father. The King’s younger brother also agreed with the younger prince that he should be entitled to receive something of the heir.

The precious Emerald Buddha, Wat Phra Kaeow (photo credit: JPSwimmer, wikipedia.org)

The precious Emerald Buddha, Wat Phra Kaeow (photo credit: JPSwimmer, wikipedia.org)

One day, a bold thief entered the palace and stole the precious emerald. Thus, neither of the Princes received it. The King was vexed and the Princes upset and enraged. However, finally nothing could be done about this matter, the emerald was gone forever and this is the end of this Thai folk tale.

Yours, Sirinya

(Reference: P.C. Roy Chaudhury, Folk Tales of Thailand, SterlingPublishers, 1976)

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