Discover a different side of Thailand: “One Night Stay with Locals”

From Southern provinces that you may already be familiar with such as Phang Nga and Chumphon, to the more remote Northern provinces of Lampang, Nan and many more, 13 destinations have been carefully chosen by the Tourism Authority of Thailand as part of this newly-launched “One Night Stay with Locals” project.

Not only are these villages very remote (meaning you will beat the crowds even in high season), there is also a huge variety of community-focused activities available, such as getting your hands dirty picking fruit in orchids with the locals, taking tractor rides through the jungle to waterfalls or heading out on fishermen’s boats to find the catch of the day!

One Night Stay with Locals

Spanning across four provinces (Lampang, Chiang Rai and Nan) there are four different communities to visit in the North of Thailand as part of this One Night Stay with Locals program – each one as fascinating as the next. Tucked away in the mountains of Lampang, there is the chance to go miang leaf picking with the locals at Baan Pa Miang, as well as to learn how to make (and eat) the popular dish using this produce.

ป่าเหมี้ยง-Lampang-One Night Stay with Locals

ป่าเหมี้ยง-Lampang-One Night Stay with Locals

ป่าเหมี้ยง-Lampang- learn how to make (and eat) the popular dish

ป่าเหมี้ยง-Lampang- learn how to make (and eat) the popular miang leaf dish

Neighboring Chiang Rai province has two destinations to choose from: the laidback Pangha Homestay near the border to Myanmar where you can learn all about the Tai Lue people and the old-age craftsmanship, or Baan Tha Khan Tong, a thriving community next to the Mae Kong River that combines elements of Isaan and Lanna culture. To truly get away from it all, Nan province’s Sila Petch village feels like it is in the middle of nowhere, yet there are still plenty of friendly locals to show you around the area and guide you through the forests to a waterfall.

ท่าขันทอง-Tha Khan Tong Chiang Rai

ท่าขันทอง-Tha Khan Tong Chiang Rai

ท่าขันทอง-Tha Khan Tong Chiang Rai

ท่าขันทอง-Tha Khan Tong Chiang Rai

In addition, Baan Khiri Wong Kot in the northeast of the country (Udon Thani) lets you experience a true taste of Isaan – especially the deliciously spicy food, rural countryside and famously friendly Isaan hospitality from the locals.

คีรีวงกต-Udon Thani

คีรีวงกต-Udon Thani

คีรีวงกต- Udon Thani

คีรีวงกต- Udon Thani

Tourists also flock to Thailand’s Southern provinces for the beaches, boat rides and adventure activities. In the southern communities, you can experience all of this and more – but still far away from the crowds. For example, at Phang Nga’s hidden Baan Sam Chong Nuea community there’s a chance to explore swamps and mangrove forests with a local fisherman while helping to afforest the area. At Pa Tew (Bang Son) in Chumphon, most of your time will also be spent on the water while eating as much seafood as you can, rafting and spotting fireflies in the evening.

ประทิว-Chumphon

ประทิว-Chumphon

ประทิว-Chumphon-Seafood

ประทิว-Chumphon-Seafood

Other local communities waiting to be discovered are located in the less-frequently visited provinces of Phatthalung and Yala. These include the stunning Tamod Community where you can join in with a range of sufficiency economy educational activities, as well as kayaking and taking in the sunset over the reservoir, while Yala’s Chulaporn Pattana 9 Tourism Community is famous for its gorgeous combination of forests, mountains and rivers.

จุฬาภรณ์พัฒนา-Yala

จุฬาภรณ์พัฒนา-Yala

Phatthalung

Phatthalung

Last but not least, other choices of local communities that you can visit includes Bo Hin Farm Stay in Trang, Phrom Lok in Nakorn Si Thammarat, Laem Pak Bia in Petchaburi and Laem Klat in Trat.

แหลมกลัด- Trat

แหลมกลัด- Trat

Food at Nakorn Si Thammarat

Food at Nakorn Si Thammarat

For more information, please visit ‘One Night Stay with Locals’ and check out Facebook and stand a chance to win free trips with locals.




A Complete Guide to Beach Weddings in Koh Samui, Thailand

With their stunning and romantic scenery and the chance to make some long lasting memories, a beach wedding in Thailand is popular with couples who are planning to tie the knot. The large and lovely island of Koh Samui is a great place to get married as it boasts a large number of stunning sandy beaches, excellent resorts complete with luxurious spas and honeymoon suites and plenty of activities for the happy couple to enjoy while they unwind and enjoy this piece of paradise. Here are some things to take into consideration if you are thinking about getting married in Koh Samui.

Beach Weddings in Koh Samui, Thailand

Beach Weddings in Koh Samui, Thailand

 

Choosing the Right Time of Year

Thailand features three distinct seasons; the winter season, the summer and the monsoon season. The winter runs from November until February and this is typically the most popular time of year to arrange a beach wedding in Thailand as couples are treated to plenty of dry days and the weather is typically cooler at this time of year. While there are plenty of dry days from the end of February until the end of June, temperatures soar at this time of year and April and May in particular tend to be very hot and humid. While temperatures fall at the end of July, rainfall is common until the middle of October. Couples who want to beat the heat without paying inflated prices during the height of the tourist season will find that there are plenty of great deals to enjoy in October and March.

 

Selecting the Perfect Beach

There are several stunning stretches of golden sand on the island that make ideal locations for Samui beach weddings. While Chaweng is the largest beach on the island, this is also the most popular area of the island among tourists and the bars that line the beach pump out loud music long into the night. Just to the south of Chaweng, Lamai features a number of upmarket beachside resorts that offer luxurious services, although the nightlife scene here aimed more at party people than those who want to unwind in style. For a more romantic experience, couples are sure to love the quiet northern shore beach of Choeng Mon. Couples who choose to tie the knot here can be almost certain that the beach will be deserted, while a few luxurious hotels can be found on the cliff top overlooking the beach, providing a stunning setting for a tropical wedding. The northern coast is also home to Mae Nam, which is a narrow stretch of powdery golden sand that boasts stunning sunsets and a laid back atmosphere.

 

All Inclusive wedding Packages

Many of the leading Samui wedding planners such as resorts and hotels off all inclusive wedding packages. People who opt for one of these wedding packages will find that everything is taken care of for them, from the wedding itself to the reception, the Samui wedding photographer and accommodation for the happy couple and their guests.

 

Planning Your Budget

Of course, before you can select a wedding package or start planning your beach wedding in Thailand, you will need to work out how much money you are willing to spend. Important considerations include the cost of accommodation and flights, activities in Thailand and the wedding reception. It is possible to cut costs significantly by choosing to get married in the low season when there are plenty of deals and discounts to choose from and couples can also save money by shopping around and booking their beach wedding in Koh Samui far in advance.

by Wassana Lampech




The White Elephant in Thai Culture

In my view, one of the most impressive and majestic animals is the elephant, in particular the white elephant. Hence, in Thai culture the white elephant is called ‘chang samkhan’ which means ‘auspicious elephant’. Whitness is regarded as an sign of purity in this context. The white elephant has an important meaning in both Hinduism and Buddhism. In Hinduist thought, the white elephant is related to the God Indra who is also a guardian deity in Buddhism. His elephant can also fly and it is called ‘Airavata’.

White Elephant in Thai Culture

White Elephant of Thailand (Dressed) (credit: Sodacan, wikimedia.org)

White Elephant of Thailand (Dressed) (credit: Sodacan, wikimedia.org)

This kind of elephant is thus also related to Buddha’s conception since his mother Maya is said to have been circled by a white elephant three times until it entered her womb through her right side. Thus, in Thailand white elephants (‘chang phueak’) are not only considered to be auspicious but they also belong lawfully to the King.

Have you ever seen a white elephant? In fact, ‘chang phueak’ are not necessarily albinos but are  much paler than common elephants. Their skin may be light grey, beige or even have a rosy or pinkish hue. Think of the impressive procession of eleven white elephants at the Grand Palace in honor of Thailand’s late King Bhumibol Adulyadej in Bangkok on the 8th November 2016.

In Thai culture, the status of Kings have been rated by the number of white elephants that were in their possession and they have been historicalled considered an appendage to the King’s majesty. Hence, the late King H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej owned the greatest number of white elephants. He had 21 white elephants and this can be regarded as an unprecedented achievement. Eleven of these elephants are still alive but only five of them have royal titles.

White Elephants – Monument to honour King Bhumibol Adulyadej in front of Bangkok's Lak Mueang (credit Puja1984, wikimedia.org)

White Elephants – Monument to honour King Bhumibol Adulyadej in front of Bangkok’s Lak Mueang (credit Puja1984, wikimedia.org)

Hence, how does a ‘chang phueak’ become a royal elephant? An elephant has to undergo an number of tests conducted by the Bureau of the Royal Household since it is important to ensure that the elephant is suited for the title and has not only the physical but also the behaviourial characteristics required.

The White Elephant Flag Thai national flag from 1855 to 1916, 31 December (credit: wikimedia.org)

The White Elephant Flag was the Thai national flag from 1855 to 1916, 31 December (credit: wikimedia.org)

In the past, Thai Kings also gave white elephants as presents to friends and allies. This was a blessing or curse since an elephant considered sacred was not supposed to work and at the same time it needed care and food. Thus, a ‘chang phueak’ could easily become a huge financial burden to the owner unless the King would also provide the recipient with land for the elephant.

Summing up, we may say that the white elephant has been the most sacred and auspicious animal in Thai culture since it is also considered as a royal animal related to the King.

Yours, Sirinya

 




Dreaming of Lotus Flowers

Recently I’ve had a vivid dream about a beautiful light mansion with a pool of white lotus flowers in front. I had the feeling that this place was somewhere in Thailand. I often dream of landscapes and particularly of those in Southeast Asia. I guess this is why I long to see all these amazing places in reality. Thus, I’ve wondered what the meaning of the lotus flower is and in the days following this dream, I’ve done a bit of research about lotus as symbol.

Lotus Flowers

Lotus (credit: Love Krittaya, wikimedia.org)

Lotus (credit: Love Krittaya, wikimedia.org)

First of all, I’ve learned about the spiritual and religious meaning of the lotus flower in different cultures. In ancient Egypt, for instance, the lotus was a symbol of rebirth and hence it was commonly used for wall and tomb paintings. The lotus has the power to renew itself since it loses old blooms and adds new ones in a daily cycle.

The lotus is also a symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism. In Hinduism, this flower stands for eternity, purity and peace. Hence, it is also the flower of the Gods for Brahma, the ultimate creator of the world, arises from a lotus. It is very interesting to note that in Buddhism the lotus flower has even more, i.e. a variety of meanings. For example, it symbolizes self-awareness, love and compassion of all beings and things, emptiness from desire, enlightenment, victory over attachments, overcoming suffering and spiritual development. Thus, the lotus also stands for patience, purity and mysticism.

Graceful 2014 painting by Narongrit Galajit

Graceful 2014 painting by Narongrit Galajit

You certainly know the lotus position which is a way of sitting during meditation. It is an important position in Buddhist meditation but also in yoga practices. The lotus has a deep spiritual meaning and in the lotus position the legs are crossed and tucked in a way that makes the bent knees look like the petals of a lotus. It is important that the soles of the feet are tucked away so that it is a respectful position to sit in when visiting a temple where exposing the bottom of your feet is considered rude.

In fact, there are lotus flowers and water lilies of different colours. Since I saw white lotus in my dream let me focus on the meaning of this paritcular colour: The white lotus symbolizes awakening, representing spiritual perfection and purity. Hence, it also stands for peace and a peaceful mind.

Well, how to interpret this dream now? Maybe I’m a person who is lucidly dreaming but the mansion and the lotus flowers surely symbolize a way to realize my longing and a path to awakening, in a worldly but also in a spiritual sense. How about you? Have you ever dreamed of water lilies or other flowers?

Yours, Sirinya

Reference: https://www.lotusflowermeaning.net/

http://www.flowermeaning.com/lotus-flower-meaning/

 




Tha Maharaj: Life at the River

‘Tha Maharaj’ is a community mall located on Maharaj Road in the Rattanakosin area, thus in walking distance of Thammasat University. The Rattanakosin Island was built in the early Rattanakosin period. Hence, Tha Maharaj tries to capture the charm of the old town’s architecture.

Tha Maharaj (photo credit: Amporn Konglapumnuay)

Tha Maharaj (photo credit: Amporn Konglapumnuay)

This community mall is thus in close proximity of the Chao Phraya River and there is also the Tha Maharaj Pier. What is more, it is surrounded by some important cultural attractions of Bangkok including The Grand Palace, Wat Arun and Wat Pho. Nearby this place are also Silpakorn Fine Arts University and Siriraj Hospital.

Tha Maharaj Pier at the Chao Phraya River (photo credit: Amporn Konglapumnuay)

Tha Maharaj Pier at the Chao Phraya River*

Of course, due to this location, Tha Maharaj has become a tourist attraction as well. However, locals also love this place because there are specialists of antiques and one of the greatest Thai amulet markets in the country.

At Tha Maharaj*

A community mall with many shops and restaurants*

Tha Maharaj aims at bringing the beauty of the Chao Phraya River near to the visitors. In addition, people should get to know and enjoy the local culinary specialities which can also be referred to as the Taste of the River. What is more, the place surprises the visitor with some colourful details 🙂 Thus, there is also a community garden and a riverside promenade.

There a numerous shops and a community garden*

There a numerous shops and a community garden*

Colourful details for a good mood*

Colourful details for a good mood*

Tha Maharaj includes seven buildings in total and a parking building. There are more that 50 restaurants, retail shops dedicated to fashion and beauty. You can reach this place by road but also via Chao Phraya Express Boat. Other options to get there are Chao Phraya Tourist Boat, Long-Tail Boats and Private Boats.

Reach the Tha Maharaj by road or by boat*

Reach the Tha Maharaj by road or by boat*

Summing up, Tha Maharaj is certainly worth a visit since there are not only numerous interesting shops, facilities and restaurants but also special events and activities like weekend market.

A colourful place for special events and friends of the Chao Phraya River*

A colourful place for special events like the weekend market and friends of the Chao Phraya River*

For more information check out: Tha Maharaj

Yours, Sirinya

(All photos in this post, credit: Amporn Konglapumnuay)




Retirement in Thailand

Thailand has become a popular country for retirees from Western countries. The best places for retirement in Thailand are considered to be Chiang Mai, Pattaya and Bangkok. Today, there are also retirement villages and homes for those who need assisted living.

Even though the options for retirement homes are still limited in Thailand, there are three facilities that admit expats in need of daily assistance. For instance, there are the Thailand Retirement and Long Term Care Communities in Pattaya. This institution has been known for assisting disabled foreigners.

Retirement in Thailand

Retirement in Thailand

Retirement in Thailand

Pattaya is a nice location for all retirees who like to enjoy the beach, sun, entertainment and fast life in a transcient place. Nevertheless, there are also two main hospitals that offer great healthcare. These are Pattaya International, a private hospital, and there is Pattaya-Bangkok International which is located a short distance outside of Pattaya.

What is more, in Bangkok you can find the Golden Years Hospital which also take care of elderly expats. They also offer special tour programmes for elders in which the elderly are accompanied by a personal caregiver. There are many advantages of being nursed in the Golden Years Hospital because the doctors and nurses provide warm and close care.

Another well-known facility is the Mc Kean Rehabilitation Centre in Chaing Mai which has a complete nursing home for the elderly. It is a Christian Centre which wants to provide good life quality to seniors so that they can live in a caring and supportive community with dignity.

Thailand is a popular place for retirees from Western countries

Thailand is a popular place for retirees from Western countries

If you do not necessarily need a retirement home, there is also the possibility to buy or rent a small condo. Particularly, these kind of small condo units can be found in Pattaya where there is a large expat community. If you want to buy such a condo of around 50 square meters, the price is commonly around 900,000 Baht.

These condos for expats are usually in close proximity to immigration facilities. For instance, in Pattaya, Thai Immigration Building is in Jomtien, where you can find numerous condo units for senior expatriates. Hence, Jomtien has become a hot retirement spot and thus there are also many facilities for expats like clubs.

Actually, many of the Thai expat retirees in these areas live off their government pension. This is important because a government pension is a requirement for a retirement visa. Do you want to find out how much you need to live well in Thailand? Try the Thai Retirement Calculator found on my website.

Finally, we may say that Thailand is a very popular place for Western retirees because of the excellent weather and the generally stable economy. Thus, many Western seniors consider getting a Thai retirement visa for expats. In addition, the living costs in Thailand are much lower than in Western countries like the USA, the UK and Europe in general.

Yours, Sirinya




In loving memory of H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej

His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand (Rama IX) has died on Thusrday, the 13th October 2016 at the age of 88. He was the longest reigning King in Thai history and the world, having reigned since 9th June 1946.

King Bhumibol Adulyadej, portrait from 1946 (photo: wikimedia.org)

King Bhumibol Adulyadej, portrait from 1946 (photo: wikimedia.org)

In loving memory of H.M King Bhumibol Adulyadej

King Bhumibol the Great is the father and the soul of the Thai nation and Thai people. Hence, the King stood above the law, being revered and immensely respected by Thai people. Thus, in the last days, Thais have payed touching respect to their King in many ways. H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej may truly be called the ‘King of Hearts’ and ‘Father of the Nation’ in Thailand.

In loving memory of King Bhumibol of Thailand

In loving memory of King Bhumibol of Thailand

There is now one year of mourning for government officials in Thailand and as a sign of respect all festivities are banned for a month. Hence, Thai people are in mourning, wearing black or white clothes and tourists are also supposed to be respectful and behave and dress decently. There are many ways, Thai people pay tribute to their King, may it be through art and music but also by doing good deeds. For instance, artists have uploaded their tributes to the King on social media. Here is an example:

Students from Silpakorn University have painted large memorable pictures from the King’s life which are very impressive.

Memorable pictures from the King's life at Silpakorn University (credit: Silpakorn University FB Page)

Memorable pictures from the King’s life at Silpakorn University (credit: Silpakorn University FB Page)

Students have painted great pictures of H.M. King Bhumibol's life (credit: Silpakorn University, FB Page)

Students have painted great pictures of H.M. King Bhumibol’s life (credit: Silpakorn University, FB Page)

Similarly, students from Khon Kaen University have worked day and night to create a work of art for their King, capturing the spirit and soul of the Father of the Nation.

There are also Thai singers who have paid tribute to the King by singing the King’s Anthem. This one is particularly touching, she is singing and crying at the same time.

Finally, there is to mention a man who collected more than tousand pictures of the King for future generations to remember.

Summing up, we may sadly say the the era of H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej has come to an end and that Thailand as we knew it is now at an end too. However, we must look positively into the future, accepting that time changes everything. Nevertheless, I am convinced that the King will remain revered and unforgotten.

Yours,

Sirinya




Slow Life on Koh Phayam

How about a quiet day on Koh Phayam? I’d like to take you on a photographic journey to this island in the Andaman Sea. Koh Phayam is off the coast to Rayong Province in the East of Thailand near to the Gulf of Thailand. The island is about 30 km from Ranong.

Koh Phayam

Koh Phayam amazing seascape (photo: Siwaphong Pakdeetawan @knack66)

Koh Phayam’s amazing seascape (photo: Siwaphong Pakdeetawan @knack66)

Koh Phayam has two major beaches which are called Ao Yai (Great Bay) and Ao Kao Kwai (Buffalo Bay). As the name suggests, Ao Yai is the largest beach which is located on the west coast. In point of fact, this bay has beige-grey sand and is 300m wide and 3km long.

Beach and boats on Koh Phayam*

Beach and boats on Koh Phayam*

You can head to the isle via ferry. Actually, on the island, the main means of transportation are motorbikes since there are no roads where cars can drive.

Heading to the island via ferry, Ao Yai*

Heading to the island via ferry, Ao Yai near the Andaman Sea*

Koh Phayam is thought to be one of the most beautiful Thai islands. Thus, the isle has many amazing and also pristine beaches. In fact, it’s a nice place to chill in a hammock or lounge chair enjoying a refreshing drink like coconut water 🙂

Fresh coconuts at Koh Phayam, Ao Kao Kwai*

Fresh coconuts at Koh Phayam, Ao Kao Kwai*

Chill in a hammock on one of the most beautiful Thai islands*

Chill in a hammock on one of the most beautiful Thai islands*

Indeed, this island has been a favourite destination for hippies and globetrotters, thus some of the beaches are not so tranquil and clean anymore. However, in the northwest there is a more natural and untouched beach called Ao Kao Kwai. In fact, this beach is quite clear and not so much polluted.

Pristine seascape at Buffalo Bay, Ao Kao Kwai*

Pristine seascape at Buffalo Bay, Ao Kao Kwai*

There are not so many people either, hence this beach seems to be cosy, secluded and private. Nonetheless, Buffalo Bay is not lonely since you may encounter one of the furry inhabitants like this dog 🙂

A dog on the island*

A dog on the island*

You may also spot an amazing landscape like this rockformation or a storm approaching. There are also such stunning things like a floating pagoda at the pier.

Land- and seacape, rockformation on the island near Ranong*

Land- and seacape, rockformation on the island near Ranong*

Is there a storm appraoching? Andaman Sea, Koh Phayam*

Is there a storm appraoching? Blue sky and beach at the Andaman Sea*

A floating pagoda at a pier in Koh Phayam*

A floating pagoda at a pier in Koh Phayam*

Finally, I hope you enjoyed my little photographic trip to Koh Phayam. If you have the chance, make the island you next destination… 🙂

Yours, Sirinya

(all photos in this post, credit to Siwaphong Pakdeetawan @knack66)




Gemstones & Birthday Colours in Thai Culture

In Thai culture, each day of the week has a colour which is based on the colour of the God who is protecting the day. This attribution goes back to an astrological rule influenced by Hindu mythology.

Gemstones & Birthday Colours in Thai Culture

Red Ruby - the gem for Sunday and the God Surya (photo: Humanfeather, wikimedia.org)

Red Ruby – the gem for Sunday and the God Surya (photo: Humanfeather, wikimedia.org)

Thus, Thai people believe that each day of the week coincides with a planet and a God. Thus, each respective planet and God has a dominant colour. For instance, Surya is the God of Sunday. Since he is also the God of the Sun, his colour is red. Hence, suitable gemstones are garnet and red ruby.

Citrine, a yellow gem for Monday (photo Wela49~commonswiki, wikimedia.org)

Citrine, a yellow gem for Monday (photo: Wela49~commonswiki, wikimedia.org)

Another example is Monday which is the day of the moon. Accordingly, the God of this day is Chandra, the moon God. His colour is yellow or white. The colours of the day are hence the traditional Thai birthday colours. Since King Bhumibol was born on Monday, on the auspicious occasion of his birthday Thailand is decorated with yellow.

Pink Sapphire for Tuesday (photo Wiener Edelstein Zentrum, wikimedia.org)

Pink Sapphire for Tuesday (photo Wiener Edelstein Zentrum, wikimedia.org)

Now let us take a look at what colour is suited for your birthday. As mentioned, Sunday is the day of Surya whose colour is red. The gemstone for this day is ruby or garnet. Monday, the day of the moon, has the yellow gem citrine, yellow sapphire but also moonstone occasionally. Tuesday which is the day of the God Mangala (Mars) has pink as its ruling colour. Thus, we need pink sapphire or spinel.

Cut emerald stones (photo: irvin calicut, wikimedia.org)

Cut emerald gemstones, in Thai culture the Birthday colours of Wednesday (photo: irvin calicut, wikimedia.org)

Since Wednesday is the day of Budha (Mercury), this day’s colour is green. Suitable gems are hence green emerald and tsavorite garnet. Thursday has orange since that is the colour of  Brihaspati (Jupiter). What could be more suitable for this day than orange coral or orange sapphire!

Coral jewelry (photo: Markus Bärlocher, wikimedia.org)

Coral jewelry (photo: Markus Bärlocher, wikimedia.org)

Finally, Friday is the day of Shukra (Venus) and his colour is blue. Thus, we love blue sapphire for this day. Saturday has the colour purple since it is the day of Shani (Saturn). The gemstones for Saturday are amethyst and purple sapphire.

Blue Sapphire for Friday (photo: Wiener Edelstein Zentrum, wikimedia.org)

Blue Sapphire for Friday (photo: Wiener Edelstein Zentrum, wikimedia.org)

Amethyst for Saturday (photo: Wela48, wikimedia.org)

Amethyst for Saturday (photo: Wela48, wikimedia.org)

Here is a short clip on what color is suited for your birthday.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84A1ZKx24bg

Summing up, I think it is a very pleasant concept having birthday coulours and corresponding gemstones for each day of the week. Since I was born on a Monday, according to Thai culture, my gem is the yellow citrine 🙂 Which one is yours?

Yours, Sirinya




Thai Egg Cake – Kanom Kai

Thai egg cake is called ‘Kanom Kai’ (ขนมไข่) in Thai. This is a traditional Thai dessert recipe influenced by the Portuguese. The perfect egg cake should have a light texture, be soft inside and crispy outside similar to sponge cake and should not be too sweet.

Thai egg cake

Thai egg cake, Kanom Kai (photo credit: bloggang.com)

Thai egg cake, Kanom Kai (photo credit: bloggang.com)

Here is what you need to prepare 10 portions:

  • 150g flour
  • 5 eggs
  • 200g sugar
  • 100ml evaporated milk
  • 1 TSP vanilla flavour
  • 1/2 TSP salt
  • Aluminium cake cups or muffin cups

Preparation:

In a first step, whisk the eggs, add in the sugar and mix until it is fluffy. Put in the salt and vanilla flavour and keep on mixing everything together well. Then add in about half of the flour, mix and then add in the milk and the remaining flour. Mix everything together well. Now brush some oil or butter in the cake cups/muffin cups and then you may pour the batter into the cake cups. Let them bake for around 15-20 minutes. And you’re ready to serve! Now enjoy your egg cake with a cup of tea. Have a nice teatime! 🙂

This recipe for Thai egg cake comes from the amazing cooking channel WhatRecipe.tv. In the following video, you can easily learn how to make this dessert.

Hope you’ll give this amazing Thai dessert a try!

Yours, Sirinya

(P.S. for more general information, check out my Thai Food Dictionary)